Sometimes It Snows in April – A Tribute

Sometimes It Snows in April – A Tribute

Revered by the music industry and loved by millions of fans, and despite the controversies over his lyrical styles that some found offensive, Prince was a revolutionary artist none the less.

A prolific singer and songwriter. An unbelievably talented musician, skilled at devising new sounds across a multitude of instruments, all of which he could play. His vocal range could drop to the bottom floor and float effortlessly through a falsetto, peaking at a shriek-like scream that didn’t need a trademark because nobody else could do it quite like Prince. (And all of us who grew up listening to his music have strained our voices numerous times behind the wheel of a car, purporting to sing along at the level of his unmatched prowess. Don’t deny it!) Continue reading “Sometimes It Snows in April – A Tribute”

A Heart in the Margins

A Heart in the Margins

After nine and a half years and three billion miles, what image did NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft transmit back to Earth as it approached one of the farthest bodies in our solar system from the sun? A heart.

Pluto, actually considered a dwarf nowadays and not an official planet (minor details), is more than an icy rock in space. It will now be known as a first in space exploration and in human history. It has become a gateway of sorts, toward the edge of our solar system and beyond, and is expected to reveal some of the most up close and personal details that we’ve ever seen about this mysterious blur in the night sky. (NASA will release the highly anticipated images later today.)

But that’s not why I love this story. I love what this mission and its spacecraft, appropriately named New Horizons, represents in a time when many ideas and changes are creating divisions, especially among like-minded people. Continue reading “A Heart in the Margins”

The Art of Understanding the Artist in All of Us

The Art of Understanding the Artist in All of Us

Novelist James Scott Bell calls writers “The Fellowship of the Weird.” Cecil Murphey, co-author of the popular 90 Minutes in Heaven: A True Story of Life and Death, shares in his recent newsletter, “Because I like who I am, I like being alone with myself” (after he explains his struggle with loneliness).

Run a Google search on “artists are weird” or “artists are misunderstood,” or my favorite, “artists are crazy,” and you’ll get millions of results.

I posed a question on my Facebook page asking, “If you’re an artist, do you feel lonely or misunderstood around non-artists?” The overall answer was yes (mostly the misunderstood part). But where does that leave the non-artist? Continue reading “The Art of Understanding the Artist in All of Us”